How to consult staff on your age-inclusive working strategy

Posted by VERCIDA on Jul 5, 2019 12:28:10 PM
VERCIDA

Great management strategies focus on people. That seems like an obvious statement but planning needs to consider what people actually want. That may well be different from what management teams think they want.

In order to understand what is important to their older staff, on their own terms, forward thinking companies reach out to ask. This work sits alongside Government advice for mature workers to give their careers a mid-life MOT. When the chips fall, do your current policies match what people may realise or need?

How to consult on workplace policies

Companies already offering these kinds of staff consultation are discovering top priorities include:

● continuing training and education.

● consideration for well-being.

● flexible working.

These understandings come from conversations headed in a number of different directions. If you’re considering a similar project than a quick review of current best practice suggests good discussions will cover:

● career directions

● job design

● work-life balance

● support on health and well-being

● finance and pension planning.

As with any consultation you could consider involving both trade union representatives and senior managers. You should also make provisions to include your workers in different sites, isolated areas, or those working from home. It’s also ke to involve the whole workforce, old or young, to ensure good workplace relations a change for one has to be a change for all.

Methods of staff consultation

A variety of communications methods will be needed in a well-run consultation.Which ones you choose methods will depend mainly on the size and structure of your organisation. You could consider:

● face to face meetings

● company handbooks

● video conferencing

● intranet

● email

● notice board

● organisation newsletters

● individual letters to employees.

Quick wins when planning age-inclusive HR

These types of consultations could be done within a group, or individually, or even as part of regular performance reviews. The important point is that there should be a chance for people to feed back with confidence that their ideas will be heard. The knowledge that’s gained should then be fed back into your business plan.

Do you currently:

● create chances and opportunities of mutual cooperation among people of different ages, so as not to deepen intergenerational isolation?

● develop opportunities for staff to get to know one another? This can contribute to fewer prejudices and stereotypes which tend to arise from not knowing the other person well enough.

● encourage employees to fulfill the organization’s goals by commonly striving for them?

We don’t have all the answers though. Your employees do. Just ask, then listen.

Want to be seen as an employer that considers more than just productivity? Find out more about how the diversity and inclusion experts at VERCIDA can help.

 

 

Topics: Age Initiatives, Over 50s, Inclusion